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Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

New Rochelle, NY, June 19, 2017–Researchers compared the caffeine and chlorogenic acid components of coffee beans at different roasting levels and tested the protective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the different coffee extracts in human cell models. The results, linking increasing degree of roasting to reduced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, are published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food website until July 19, 2017.

The article entitled "Cellular Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Coffee Extracts with Different Roasting Levels," is coauthored by Soohan Jung, Korea University, Seoul, Min Hyung Kim, Jae Hee Park, and Kwang Suk Ko, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, and Yoonhwa Jeong, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea. The researchers measured the levels of caffeine and chlorogenic acid and evaluated the effects of Coffea arabica green coffee extracts roasted at levels corresponding to Light, Medium, City, and French roast. Whereas the caffeine levels did not differ greatly between the various roasting levels, the levels of chlorogenic acid did vary and correlated with the differences shown in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

"When people think of coffee, they often associate the beverage with caffeine. However, coffee beans have many other chemicals that could help fight chronic inflammatory diseases," says Journal of Medicinal Food Editor-in-Chief Sampath Parthasarathy, MBA, PhD, Florida Hospital Chair in Cardiovascular Sciences and Interim Associate Dean, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida. "Coffee drinkers are passionate about different roasts–light, medium and dark. This study suggests that some of the potentially beneficial compounds could be affected by the roasting process. This article would certainly change my coffee roast preference!"

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About the Journal

Journal of Medicinal Food is an authoritative, peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary journal published monthly online with open access options and in print. Led by Editors-in-Chief Sampath Parthasarathy, MBA, PhD, Florida Hospital Chair in Cardiovascular Sciences and Interim Associate Dean, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, and Yangha Kim, PhD, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea, the Journal publishes original scientific research on the bioactive substances of functional and medicinal foods, nutraceuticals, herbal substances, and other natural products. The Journal explores the chemistry and biochemistry of these substances, as well as the methods for their extraction and analysis, the use of biomarkers and other methods to assay their biological roles, and the development of bioactive substances for commercial use. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Medicinal Food website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine and Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Media Contact

Kathryn Ryan
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http://www.liebertpub.com

Original Source

http://www.liebertpub.com/global/pressrelease/does-roasting-level-affect-the-antioxidant-and-anti-inflammatory-properties-of-coffee-beans/2201/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2017.3935

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Story Source: Materials provided by Scienmag

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